The Most Important Lessons We Can Take From This Pandemic

The Most Important Lessons We Can Take From This Pandemic

And the people stayed home. And read books, and listened, and rested, and exercised, and made art, and played games, and learned new ways of being, and were still. And listened more deeply. Some meditated, some prayed, some danced. Some met their shadows. And the people began to think differently.

While this pandemic is turning out to be a very confusing and difficult time for many people, it is undoubtedly giving humanity an incredibly rare opportunity to learn some challenging lessons. For so long it felt that we had been living in a way that went against everything that is natural and sacred.

For our personal life, we can feel that our priorities have massively shifted due to this pandemic, and it has been eye-opening to see how so much can change in such a short space of time. Most of us are wondering what the future will hold and how this pandemic will change the way we do things.

This is our silver lining, and it will hopefully allow us to look back on this time and feel there were some benefits. Here are some valuable lessons we will learn from this:

Firstly, the power of stillness. Our lives were put on pause, many were forced to work from home, and we can no longer travel unless necessary. With this, we were given the power of stillness and the opportunity to unapologetically slow down. Take this opportunity to do the inner work that you previously had no time for. If ever there was time for personal transformation, it’s now.

Secondly, friends and family mean everything. Probably, the most difficult part of this journey for most people is being separated from their friends and family. Connection is something that is so critical for our emotional and mental well-being, yet it something we often take for granted.

After this is over, I think people will reach out to each other like never before and everyone will be so overjoyed to see their loved ones again. And just maybe we might be a little bolder and share our smiles and greetings with those we don’t even know.

Thirdly, nature continues to thrive even if the world has shutdown. For many during this lockdown, including myself, nature has been a life saver. Whether we spend time in our garden, walk through a park, do gardening, grow food, or simply poke our head out of our window for some fresh air and sunlight, the serenity of nature has been something we can rely on. While the world stopped, nature remained constant. Either way, I believe humans will make a renewed relationship with nature and just hopefully, this might lead to a big environmental change.

Fourthly, material goods mean nothing. What good are material things when your health, safety, and access to food are jeopardized? They mean zero at times like this, which I think just helps us put into perspective exactly what we should be prioritizing in our lives. Our health is gold. Health is something we so easily take for granted until it is at risk. The possibility of our health taking a downturn has made many of us pay more attention to our nutrition intake and cleanliness. Some of us have even been taking preventative health measures and steps to boost our immune system. If we have a working body with no serious physical ailments, we should be beyond grateful.

Fifth, essential workers are heroes. Every good story needs its hero, and in the story that is playing out on our planet right now, our heroes are of course key workers: healthcare workers, delivery drivers, bus and train drivers, and those who work in the supermarkets and food distribution. These are the people who are keeping everything going and right now risking their health and safety every day to do it.

In the past, so many of these professions were deemed as jobs that require little skill or don’t deserve much pay, but right now there is no saying what we would do without these people. We hope in the future these professions shall be seen with high esteem, and the soldiers fighting on the frontline will be remembered. This pandemic is teaching us one thing, it is not to take anyone or anything for granted.

How To Deal With Unemployment Among The Youth

How To Deal With Unemployment Among The Youth

An estimated 800,000 Kenyan youth join the labour market each year whereas unemployment amongst the youth is approximated to be at 35% comparable to the overall national unemployment rate of 10%.

These figures are staggering, yet there is hope still. Each and every one of us has a natural knack or gift or talent at something. Anything. If not talent, then each one of us has the ability to learn a skill of trade. When you are caught between a rock and a hard place, then you realise that the will to survive does kick in.

Ask yourself, what am I good at? What can I do, at ease that can earn me income? No matter how small at first. Because what’s important is taking that first step. Let us stop looking at the whole picture for a minute. Let us stop thinking about moving from step zero to step a hundred all at once. Instead let us look at moving from step zero to step one. One step at a time.

A journey of a thousand miles starts with one step. Then a step at a time, we shall find that we are actually moving forward. It is so important to move forward always. What’s that saying? If you can’t fly, run. If you can’t run, walk. If you can’t walk, crawl. As long as you keep moving forward.

So have some alone time to think and analyse yourself critically. What am I good at? Gifted at. Growing up, at school, what did your fellow students casually comment on your gifts? What did your teachers say you are naturally good at? Is it writing, drawing, and sports? Is it music, drama? If you can’t think of anything, then let us open our minds to learning a new skill.

In the world we live in today, there are a lot of things that we can do. Be it digital marketing, be it the beauty industry. Identify what you are good at, then market yourself. Don’t be shy. Ask for help. Beggars are not choosers. Network. Dare to put yourself out there.

Then before you know it, you have moved from step zero to step one, then step two. If before you didn’t have a thousand shillings. Now you earn that a thousand. You will feel such joy. Such pride. That will propel you to move to step two. Then step three. And as time moves by, you find that you actually have a running business that is earning you income.

Then you get capital to expand your trade. Do more on a larger scale. Then before you know it, the workload becomes too much for just one person, and you hire help. You just created employment! That is creativity .That is innovation.

For those of us who are blessed with the capability to create employment urge you to take a chance at our Kenyan youth. With caution obviously, but remember, many a folk strive for high ideals. Thus your calculated risk may just turn into a profitable venture.

Give that friend you know that job you need done. That assignment you need get done. Give the youth a chance. They are the future. And they may surprise you with their talent, and natural gifts. Let us support the local traders rather than rushing to import. As consumers, let us buy from that local manufacturer instead of going for that expensive imported product.

Let us support our own. Because we have the solution in our hands. Right here. We just have to think outside the box. Push ourselves beyond our comfort zone. The human brain is malleable and expandable to accommodate the need to survive. Necessity is the mother of invention. Where there is a will, there is always a way. Let us do this!

 

Scientists warn of a potential wave of COVID-linked brain damage

Scientists warn of a potential wave of COVID-linked brain damage

LONDON (Reuters) – Scientists warned on Wednesday of a potential wave of coronavirus-related brain damage as new evidence suggested COVID-19 can lead to severe neurological complications, including inflammation, psychosis and delirium.

A study by researchers at University College London (UCL)described 43 cases of patients with COVID-19 who suffered either temporary brain dysfunction, strokes, nerve damage or other serious brain effects.

The research adds to recent studies which also found the disease can damage the brain.

“Whether we will see an epidemic on a large scale of brain damage linked to the pandemic – perhaps similar to the encephalitis lethargica outbreak in the 1920s and 1930s after the 1918 influenza pandemic – remains to be seen,” said Michael Zandi, from UCL’s Institute of Neurology, who co-led the study.

COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, is largely a respiratory illness that affects the lungs, but neuroscientists and specialist brain doctors say emerging evidence of its impact on the brain is concerning.

My worry is that we have millions of people with COVID-19 now. And if in a year we have 10 million recovered people, and those people have cognitive deficits … then that’s going to affect their ability to work and their ability to go about activities of daily living,” Adrian Owen, a neuroscientist at Western University in Canada, told Reuters in an interview.

In the UCL study, published in the journal Brain, nine patients who had brain inflammation were diagnosed with a rare condition called acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) which is more usually seen in children and can be triggered by viral infections.

The team said it would normally see about one adult patient with ADEM per month at their specialist London clinic, but this had risen to at least once a week during the study period, something they described as “a concerning increase”.

“Given that the disease has only been around for a matter of months, we might not yet know what long-term damage COVID-19 can cause,” said Ross Paterson, who co-led the study. “Doctors need to be aware of possible neurological effects, as early diagnosis can improve patient outcomes.”

Owen said the emerging evidence underlined the need for large, detailed studies and global data collection to assess how common such neurological and psychiatric complications were.

He is running an international research project at covidbrainstudy.com where patients can sign up to complete a series of cognitive tests to see whether their brain functions have altered since getting COVID-19.

“This disease is affecting an enormous number of people,” Owen said. “That’s why it’s so important to collect this information now.”

How ‘Joan Kubai’ has Stupidly Exposed Her Corrupt and Dirty Parents to Detectives-VIDEO

How ‘Joan Kubai’ has Stupidly Exposed Her Corrupt and Dirty Parents to Detectives-VIDEO

As you struggle to raise the rent for your bedsitter, a family in Runda has dedicated a whole bedroom to folding clothes.

This is what has surprised most Kenyans as one Joan Kubai shared a video of her luxurious home on Snapchat.

The teen took her virtual friends to a tour of her humongous home in Runda which has five bedrooms, four living rooms and a library in the artic.

Outside the home, you are greeted to a lush green garden and swimming pool. There is also a garage for the family’s numerous vehicles.

Where does one get the money for all these? It seems that Joan’s parents just like most rich Kenyans got their wealth through backdoor means.

The famous Twitter Detectives have dug deep and revealed some details about the Kubai family that Joan would wish they remained buried. Joan Kubai is the daughter of city tycoons Peter Macharia Kubai and Isabella Wairimu Kubai.

Here is the video;

 

Peter Macharia Kubai and Isabella Wairimu Kubai are joint directors of Benisa Limited, a firm which at the centre of two separate investigations by the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) into Murang’ a Governor Mwangi wa Iria’s alleged violation of the public procurement law and ghost projects in the county.

Benisa had been hired by the now-bankrupt Italian firm CMC Di Ravenna on May 15, 2015, as a subcontractor to do several works on the Itare dam project for Sh360 million.

At the time, the Italian firm accused Benisa of deploying inadequate staff and resources on-site and terminated the contract on June 22, 2018.

The company is believed to be part of a network of companies Mr Peter Macharia Kubai and his family have been accused of using to secure double payment for the same work, and in most instances, no work is done.

On this basis, Benisa Limited was, for instance, paid twice to construct a single water pan at Kangutu in Kakuzi Mitubiri ward.

According to documents, the first tender that was paid through LPO number 2835/2014 was worth Sh3.97 million while the second that was paid through LPO number 2724-2775/2 was worth Sh3.99 million.

Mr Peter Macharia Kubai is also being investigated for allegedly giving juicy kickbacks to Governor Mwangi Wa Iria to secure lucrative road repair tenders.

While digging up through the file, sleuths from EACC also stumbled onto Benisa Limited while investigating the stalled Marsabit Stadium, where the firm was paid over Sh88 million with only 20 per cent of the work done.

On July 30, 2019, Benisa Limited obtained a default judgment in a suit it filed against CMC Di Ravenna to recover Sh31.5 million for rock blasting works it did in the Itare dam project, which has also collapsed and is at the centre of a Directorate of Criminal Investigation (DCI) probe.

Documents at the Companies’ Registry show that Benisa Limited is owned by Peter Macharia Kubai (50%), Isabella Wairimu Kubai (25%) and Jadiel Macharia Kubai the remaining percentage.

All the three are said to be business associates of Murang’ a county Governor Mwangi Wa Iria.

 

Nightmare As Kenyan Parents Struggle To Control Online Content For Their Children

Nightmare As Kenyan Parents Struggle To Control Online Content For Their Children

The government has decried increasing cases of children accessing inappropriate content following the closure of schools over the COVID-19 pandemic. ICT Cabinet Secretary Joe Mucheru noted that there has been significant increase in the use of technology over the past three months as most of the learning is taking place online.

As people continue using technology, families are straining to understand how to manage and control how their kids are using either mobile devices or laptops. The government has directed that the Communications Authority works extremely closely with Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to ensure that children are protected online and parents learn how to filter websites from harmful content.

According to CS Mucheru, within the next 7 days, the Communication Authority and ISPs will be expected to give a very clear roadmap on how to train internet users to ensure that the Kenyan ‘cyberspace is safe’.

Parents should know that there are methods of controlling what is viewable for the young people. The media has played a big role for the content they have been releasing. It’s been good to see that for the educational content a lot of that is being provided by broadcast media both TV and radio and that is really helping families keep children occupied.

According to the United Nations, children are accessing the internet at a younger age, spending longer times online and are at greater risk of cyber bullying as the COVID-19 pandemic keeps them at home. It is estimated that 1.5 billion children are out of school due to lockdown measures to stop the spread of the new Coronavirus, forcing them to go online for their schooling but also their social lives and hobbies.

Many children are coming online earlier than their parents had intended, at much earlier ages, and without the necessary skills to protect themselves whether it is from online harassment or cyber bullying. The other thing is the length of time children are spending online whether simply for schooling, entertainment, gaming or socializing after their learning is completed.

Experts say there are two important things parents can do to protect their children from the dangers of online: Pay attention to their internet habits, and teach them how to surf the web carefully. As parents, we have to constantly be vigilant.

If you notice any warning signs, where they are spending more time online or on their phone, especially at night, there are calls coming in that seem to be out of the ordinary, go look at the history, see what’s going on.

Parents should keep their child’s computer or tablet in a common area when they do their online work and for older students, keep a close eye on any unusual charges. With many students now doing remote learning from home, it’s also important for educators to help protect children from online abuse.

Teachers should keep the scope of assignments narrow and make sure the websites they are instructing students to visit are trusted. We encourage parents of the young ones to have full access to the student’s online credentials. Children should never share any images of themselves or a classmate with anybody online.

Let them know that you can see where they go on the Internet, and whom they’re contacting on social media. Explain that this is the cost of their using tech. They will complain, but they will trust you, and in the long run, they will develop self-control.

Nightmare As Kenyan Parents Struggle To Control Online Content For Their Children

Nightmare As Kenyan Parents Struggle To Control Online Content For Their Children

The government has decried increasing cases of children accessing inappropriate content following the closure of schools over the COVID-19 pandemic. ICT Cabinet Secretary Joe Mucheru noted that there has been a significant increase in the use of technology over the past three months as most of the learning is taking place online.

As people continue using technology, families are straining to understand how to manage and control how their kids are using either mobile devices or laptops. The government has directed that the Communications Authority work extremely closely with Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to ensure that children are protected online and parents learn how to filter websites from harmful content.

According to CS Mucheru, within the next 7 days, the Communication Authority and ISPs will be expected to give a very clear roadmap on how to train internet users to ensure that the Kenyan ‘cyberspace is safe’.

Parents should know that there are methods of controlling what is viewable for the young people. The media has played a big role for the content they have been releasing. It’s been good to see that for the educational content, a lot of that is being provided by broadcast media, both TV and radio, and that is really helping families keep children occupied.

According to the United Nations, children are accessing the internet at a younger age, spending longer time online and are at greater risk of cyber bullying as the COVID-19 pandemic keeps them at home. It is estimated that 1.5 billion children are out of school due to lockdown measures to stop the spread of the new Coronavirus, forcing them to go online for their schooling but also their social lives and hobbies.

Many children are coming online earlier than their parents had intended, at much earlier ages and without the necessary skills to protect themselves whether it is from online harassment or cyber bullying. The other thing is the length of time children are spending online whether simply for schooling or for entertainment, gaming or socializing after their learning is completed.

Experts say there are two important things parents can do to protect their children from the dangers online: Pay attention to their internet habits, and teach them how to surf the web carefully. As parents, we have to constantly be vigilant.

If you notice any warning signs, where they are spending more time online or on their phone, especially at night, there are calls coming in that seem to be out of the ordinary, go look at the history, see what’s going on.

Parents should keep their child’s computer or tablet in a common area when they do their online work and for older students, keep a close eye on any unusual charges. With many students now doing remote learning from home, it’s also important for educators to help protect children from online abuse.

Teachers should keep the scope of assignments narrow and make sure the websites they are instructing students to visit are trusted. We encourage parents of the young ones to have full access to the student’s online credentials. Children should never share any images of themselves or a classmate with anybody online.

Let them know that you can see where they go on the Internet, and whom they’re contacting on social media. Explain that this is the cost of their using tech. They will complain, but they will trust you, and in the long run, they will develop self-control.